The Nature of Inquiry: Reflection

THE NATURE OF INQUIRY Reflection

By Sara Krauskopf

A key component to any project is reflection.  Teaching students metacognitive skills so they become aware of their own learning process is where some of the most meaningful growth occurs during the course of a unit.  Reflection helps them become critical thinkers and problem  solvers–skills we all value for the long term and want to build in our students. There are a number of points during a project where it may be appropriate to ask students to stop and reflect.  Longer projects may require multiple reflections, whereas shorter projects just one. This blog entry will provide some examples of ways to have students reflect.

1:  Improve group work. Group dynamics are some of the biggest challenges to project completion.  This is an early intervention which asks students to pause and consider problems with their team.  What obstacles do we already see with our group dynamic and how can we overcome it?  I usually share these reflections with the class so students see multiple ways they can improve their process.

Group Question

2:  Daily check-ins.  Mentioned in my previous blog entry, this is a way for students to examine daily progress within their team.  They can celebrate success, think of what took their work off course that day (positive or negative developments), and decide what adjustments they should make as a result.


Sample Daily Check-in

  • Did we meet our responsibilities for today? Why or why not?
  • What do we need for tomorrow?
  • Do we have homework?

 

3:  Mid-project reflections.  This is a more formal way to consider progress towards the project goal and make mid-course modifications.  Again, this should provide an opportunity for positive reinforcement of current systems and behaviors; or time to make adjustments to get back on track.  This individual writing assignment is turned in, helping me understand where individual students may be having trouble so I can jump in to facilitate changes where they are most needed.  


Sample Mid-project Reflection

Students were challenged to design, build and test a solar box cooker to melt chocolate during a Wisconsin winter.  We stopped to reflect after students tested the first iteration of the cooker.

  • What went well with our design stage?
  • What went well with construction and testing?
  • How well did our team work together?
  • What specific improvements need to be made?

 

4:  Final project reflections.  Never skip this type of reflection.  It is the most important part of the project and helps students review what they learned: not only related to the content of their project, but also about how to plan and implement a complex activity.  This is a formal individual writing assignment given after all of the products are constructed and presentations are given.

If this were a straightforward science experiment I might ask students to reflect on experimental error and to suggest additional investigations they would try to further their understanding of the processes involved.  However, in project-based learning, I ask them to think beyond what they learned from the content.  They consider the impact of their work on others; and most importantly think back on what it took to complete this project and assess what they learned about navigating a complex process.


Sample Final Project Reflection.

For the waste management project discussed in my last blog, students were given this prompt along with a detailed outline of questions to consider.

You just finished an intensive group project to create a solution to the question, “How can we reduce the amount of waste that ends up in a landfill?”

  • What did you do?
  • Why was your project important?
  • How could this project be changed?

 

One of the reasons students at PBL schools get better and better at conducting projects is because of this reflective process.  They learn the importance of planning, the value of good partnerships, the need to stay organized and on task, and myriad other skills.  They are able to transfer those new skills to the next project and to their daily lives; and develop the ability to design more complex projects and solve more involved problems.  

As teachers, we always run out of time on units and need to cut out certain activities, but I strongly believe that you should leave time for reflection.  It is better to cut the project short and ask students, If you had more time what would you have done?  Without giving them time to reflect they will not develop critical thinking and other lifelong metacognitive skills that will help them successfully navigate the world as adults.

Sara Krauskopf is a secondary science and math teacher and educational consultant.  For questions or comments, contact her at sjkrauskopf@gmail.com

 

The ISN is Thankful For Brave School Leadership

By: Barry Golden – ISN Consultant

As we approach Thanksgiving Day, ISN staff and several members of our Board of Directors have been reflecting on our service and impact on education in Wisconsin since our inception nearly four years ago.

We all concurred that innovation must continue to be our focus and passion.  In that spirit, we asked ourselves,

“what is the ISN thankful for in this season of gratitude?

There are a lot of innovations occurring in some 4K-12 classrooms and school buildings in Wisconsin, but we are still waiting for the inspired wave of risk taking leaders to establish zones of innovation within school districts across the state and the country to establish schools that “Do Different.”  There are some great examples of such schools and we want to express our appreciation and to honor those educators who are truly bending the curve of innovation by challenging the “one size fits all” mindset that seems to have hijacked our educational system.

We wish to honor and pay tribute to those leaders, staff, school boards and community members who have found a way to foster and empower teachers to assume a more active role in how we educate students differently; not only for students with differences, but with structures that recognize and educate students based on their strengths and interests versus trying to fix student weaknesses so they can fit a “proficient or advanced” factory model where individual differences are seen as being abnormal.

So, to those individuals who are doing education differently, be they board members, administrators, teaching staff or community groups, we thank you for your creativity and belief that guiding student learning fosters and supports curiosity which is what drives all humans to be different.

Here on the Pulse

On the Pulse of Morning

Here on the pulse of this new day is a verse from my favorite poem of all time, On the Pulse of Morning by Maya Angelou. Most of you probably heard of Dr. Angelou’s passing yesterday. I’m sure many of you were impacted by her work in some way in your lives. When she read On the Pulse of Morning at Bill Clinton’s inauguration in 1993, only the second poet in history to speak at a presidential inauguration, I was transfixed with hope and possibility for our future and moved deeply by the meaning behind her poem.

Of course it is clear that Angelou was known for her words. Her autobiographical novel, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings brought critical acclaim to her life in 1971 and is still highly renowned today. You may not know that in her 86 years, Maya Angelou was also a professor, a civil rights activist, a dancer, an actress, a movie director, and a singer. Angelou received numerous awards in her lifetime, including the Medal of Freedom, our country’s highest civilian honor, from President Barack Obama at the White House in 2011. I was blessed to be able to meet Maya Angelou and be part of a group that had an “afternoon tea” with her in the early 90s when she was in Wisconsin. She was asked at the table what she had said in her life that she was most proud of. She laughed her throaty laugh and replied, “It really doesn’t matter what any of us have said. What matters is what we do. Who we are. What we believe. How we treat each other. And, can I get some more water?” If we weren’t already captivated by her booming spirit, we definitely were after that.

I would argue that the words Angelou chose throughout her lifetime indeed did matter in our world. One of my favorite quotes of hers is, “Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.” I think Alfie Kohn would agree.  He shared with us earlier at our March conference that it takes courage to be an educator in today’s world of high stakes testing, mandates that we don’t necessarily agree with, and the list goes on. In his article, Encouraging Courage, Kohn says, “It takes courage to stand up to absurdity when all around you people remain comfortably seated.  But if we need one more reason to do the right thing, consider this:  The kids are watching us, deciding how to live their lives in part by how we’ve chosen to live ours.”

So today, on the pulse of our final weeks of school, remember courage. Remember that you make a difference. You don’t have to be a famous poet or actress. You probably won’t be honored with a Medal of Freedom. You teach. What could be more courageous than that?

Heather Terrill-Stotts – Executive Director

2014 WISN Conference on Innovation – What’s Your Plan?

On behalf of the Wisconsin Innovative Schools Network, I can’t tell you how thrilled I am about our upcoming Conference on Innovation. If you’re reading this, I sure hope you’ll be there, too, since beginning on March 26, you’ll join nearly 500 educators who will gather for three days of networking, problem solving, and collaboration with colleagues from all across the state—and with some of the most inspiring thought leaders in education today. Personally, I can’t wait to hear Alfie Kohn talk about high stakes testing and the discussion I KNOW will ensue!

As I’ve learned throughout my career, conferences can be overwhelming with opportunities and possibilities. Want to get the most of this conference? Here are some tips that I’ve found helpful:

Begin with (realistic) goals. Before you get to the conference, ask yourself: What goals can I realistically attend to during this short time? If I could only do three things what would they be? How can you keep those goals fresh in your mind while staying open to the unexpected?

Plan ahead for how you will take your learning home. If you’re attending the conference with a team, you’re in the best position to strategize about how to implement your learning. But even on your own, identify specific actions you’ll take when you leave the conference. How will you share new knowledge with others? How will you continue your learning and collaborative efforts?

Remember, experts are everywhere. Your most significant insights may come from conversation with someone at your lunch table or from the person sitting next to you who’s gone through the a similar challenge and found a great solution. Don’t be shy! Introduce yourself. Ask people for e-mail addresses and put them in a safe place so you really can stay in touch.

Find time to reflect every day. Allow yourself the time and space to review what you’ve heard. Find a reflection partner if discussion helps you process new information. Take advantage of social media to put a new idea out into the world. Perhaps take a brief moment to journal after sessions to track first impressions and identify questions.

Schedule a conference follow up. Whether you set a Blue Jeans Network or Skype date with a new peer or volunteer to present to your local school board, you’ll reinforce your learning and find new ways to apply your knowledge with intentional follow up that extends beyond your first couple of weeks back at home.

We’ve designed incredible learning experiences led by some of the best leaders in education. Our great hope is that you’ll discover new ways of thinking about your school or your own teaching practice and through modeling and coaching build capacity in others. I’m looking forward to welcoming all returning attendees from last year’s inaugural conference—and hope to see many new faces, too. Remember: Don’t be shy. Please introduce yourself as the leader that you are!

WISN will tweet throughout the conference and invites you to do the same. Follow the conference and attendees as they share their learning with #WISN2014 or at our official Twitter page. Don’t forget to check out the conference app for more up to the minute info.  Just go to eventmobi.com/wisn2014 on any device.