Creating KTEC: Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum

Creating KTEC: Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum

The mission of Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum (KTEC), a preschool – eighth grade charter school that engages all students in an innovative learning environment, is to prepare students through academic excellence by the use of 21st Century skills and technology integration. Students at KTEC are participants and collaborators in engaging lessons that integrate technology into all curriculum areas to ensure learning and higher order thinking skills.

The Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum (KTEC) serves the needs of students in preschool through eighth grade.  KTEC opened with 325 students in the fall of 2007 and now is at capacity with 471 students and over 300 on a waiting list.

We all know that technology has revolutionized how people around the world work, play, and communicate.  Studies show that the meaningful integration of technology into the curriculum can enhance student learning.  Integrating technology in the curriculum also helps students improve the skills that are necessary to succeed in a future dominated by technology.

The IES (Institute of Education Sciences) Practice Guide, published by the U.S. Department of Education, presents evidence-based advice to practitioners working to encourage girls in mathematics and science. The Guide provides five recommendations for encouraging girls in mathematics and science, including the level of evidence to support each recommendation and guidance for carrying out each recommendation. These recommendations include the following:

  1. Teachers should explicitly teach students that academic abilities are expandable and improvable in order to enhance girls’ beliefs about their abilities.
  2. Teachers should provide students with prescriptive, informational feedback regarding their performance.
  3. Teachers should expose girls to female role models who have achieved in math or science in order to promote positive beliefs regarding women’s abilities in math and science.
  4. Teachers can foster girls’ long-term interest in math and science by choosing activities connecting math and science activities to careers in ways that do not reinforce existing gender stereotypes and choosing activities that spark initial curiosity about math and science content.
  5. Teachers should provide opportunities for students to engage in spatial skills training.

KTEC is headed in the right direction, utilizing the IES recommendations for the future of their students. According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, in the next five years, STEM jobs are projected to grow twice as quickly as jobs in other fields. While all jobs are expected to grow by 10%, STEM jobs are expected to increase by 21%. Similarly, 80% of jobs in the next decade will require technical skills. The US Department of Labor claims that out of the 20 fastest growing occupations projected to 2014, fifteen of them require significant mathematics or science preparation. The U.S. will have over one million job openings in STEM-related fields by 2018; yet, according to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, only 16% of U.S. bachelor’s degrees will specialize in STEM. As a nation, we are not graduating nearly enough STEM majors to supply the demand. To put these numbers into perspective, of the 3.8 million 9th graders in the US, only 233,000 end up choosing a STEM degree in college (National Center for Education Statistics).

One of the major tenets of KTEC is that staff members need to have training that fits the school’s mission as well as their own professional needs and interests. Dr. Angela Andersson, Principal of KTEC, is a leader who believes in shared governance and empowering staff members and parents to take the necessary steps to continue forward progress. As an example, staff members Michelle Zazula and Sarah McMillian have had ongoing national training in STEM practices and Project Lead the Way and are now training not only staff members in their own building but educators across the state and nation.  Scott Hodges has also been trained in myriad STEM approaches as well as Lego Robotics and uses his expertise to offer training across the nation as well.

In partnership with the Wisconsin Innovative Schools Network, KTEC staff have been sharing their practices with educators across the state and continue to do so with planned visitations and collaboration days throughout the 2013-14 school year. You can find out more by visiting InnovativeSchoolsNetwork.com or KTEC.kusd.edu.

Welcome to the 2013-14 School Year with WISN

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction announced the recipients of charter school grants to support the opening of 19 new charter schools for the 2013-14 school year.  These new schools are among those included in a new round of federally funded charter school grants for the state totaling $12.8 million. WISN will be partnering with almost all of those grantees.  We look forward to the experience and enthusiasm they will bring to the WISN, a new and growing network that works best with educators willing to engage in a give and take of ideas, seeking and sharing at the same time.

Collaboration is at the heart of WISN’s success because schools in general, and charter schools in particular, face many challenges as they operate in a public environment that is often uninformed or sometimes hostile. We believe committed educators are key to changing this environment, and that by working together we can realize the innovation and school improvements we dream of for our students.

WISN is an organization built on these dreams, but it is also built with a deep understanding of the day-to-day needs of educators like you. Our team knows what it takes to implement technology, examine pedagogy, build community, deal with budgeting, planning, and governance—and a host of other subjects crucial for successful charter schools. This is perhaps our greatest value: To offer expertise, consultation, and services on topics such as these, while we expand our own pool of experts from our partners.

To help them choose the services right for their schools, we’re delighted to present our brand new online Marketplace where partners will be able to browse and “shop” for WISN events, workshops, etc. Partners will gather the decision-makers for their school, explore the Marketplace together, and create their WISN School Profile and Service Agreement by following the instructions in the Marketplace.

You can join with us by heading to our online Marketplace to register for WISN workshops, online sessions, visitation days, or just browse our website to learn about other partner schools. Above all, we are a network of resources. If we don’t know the answer to your question, we can point you to someone who does. We’re confident that partnering with the network will make your school stronger, and we are also confident that other schools will be stronger for your contributions.

Welcome to an exciting upcoming school year. We look forward to working with you.

Dr. Heather Terrill Stotts, Executive Director

The 5 Things You Need to Make Your School Great

This was the first weekend in a very long time that we’ve had sunshine and warmth. Springtime in Wisconsin (albeit very late this year) always brings about a promise of what we know will follow. The ‘greening’ of everything around us and the growth pushing through the ground are reminders that the seasons cycle, ultimately, and with the exception of taking better care of our environment, there is little we have to do with this cycle.

To me, the analogy to students receiving a public education is obvious. No matter what happens, children arrive at the threshold of our schools on or around September 1 every year and leave us again sometime in June. We have no control over the students that are sent to us. They arrive and we teach them. Like flowers in the spring, we nurture their growth and watch them go through changes throughout their years with us. It is our hope that when they leave the K-12 system, they will become productive, well-educated, happy members of society. Yet, are we really making any change to the system which they go through? Are the students of today getting a radically different education than generations gone by?

I contend that we know what is good in schools. We have the knowledge that what makes schools great is simple: (1) education built on experiential, developmentally appropriate practices; (2) deep and meaningful parental and community involvement; (3) engaged highly-trained educational professionals who are given time to meaningfully collaborate and are passionate about their roles in the school while receiving ongoing training in effective practices; (4) a strong school leader; (5) enough funding to be able to ensure the first four items listed. And yet, we continue to try to find quick fixes because we don’t implement one through five above.

My daughter, Celeste, is eight years old. Her classroom is a 2nd/3rd grade multi-age and her teacher is wonderful. Energetic, positive, and a good communicator. Celeste is the last of my four children to have gone through this school district. We have seen NCLB come and go (almost), Assertive Discipline, basal reading series, multi-age and single grade classes, PBIS including rewards and punishments, the WI Model Academic Standards and now the Common Core State Standards, and the list goes on. Just recently I found out that the district is implementing Mondo: a reading series that they hope will ‘fix’ what’s wrong with literacy instruction and Celeste’s school is doing away with multi-age classrooms because it’s “too hard to meet the CCSS if you are teaching more than one grade”. The cycle seems to never end. Does this sound like your school or district? Probably so. I see this everywhere.

While there is nothing wrong with the CCSS or Mondo, the problem is that their implementation detracts from a focus on what matters most – a deep consideration of how we teach. Experiential learning in Celeste’s school is almost nonexistent. If the students go on a field trip it must be with the entire grade and no more than once a month. The trip has to have a direct tie to the CCSS for that grade level or they can’t go. We’ve seen educational trends and approaches come and go. We all roll our eyes as a new focus or system is implemented. We know that in a few years there will be something new. The problem is that these new systems rarely are a step forward in what counts. Too often we ignore the essentials that are found in our most innovative schools and superimpose a structure that disallows what is most important.

We know what’s wrong, and I believe we know what works. It’s up to all of us who care about education to ask for, advocate for, and ultimately demand that schools move forward to the essentials: experiential education, collaborative practice, focus on individuals, and encouraging students to explore how they learn, so that they’ll keep learning long after they’ve left our schools.

We nourish these flowers, and it’s a cliche to say we’re sowing seeds of the future. But just as we know a lot about how plants grow, we know enough about how children learn to proceed with a certain confidence in our fundamental approach, and not be fooled by the topdressing of the latest educational trend.

If you are interested in really moving forward, please consider partnering with the WISN. We look forward to the seasons with you.

Heather Terrill Stotts, Executive Director
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