Get the most out of the WASB Convention

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By Barry Golden – ISN Consultant

In another week, several thousand administrators and school board members will travel to Milwaukee to attend the 95th annual WASB Convention. This conference is the premier conference for school district leaders and decision makers! It is a conference where hundreds of vendors from book companies, technology companies; companies specializing in insurance, jewelry, financial investments, gym floors, architects, bleachers, banks and numerous other vendors engage attendees to purchase various good or services. It’s an experience that nearly overwhelms me as I venture around the various venues while seeking the vendors I want to meet. I have been one of those vendors on several occasions and it was exciting to meet board members and leadership personnel and learn of their challenges in delivering a PK-12 education to students, some who will enter a society and economy that we can barely predict 10-15 years from now.

Previously the owner of a K-12 educational technology, I was amazed back in the 90’s and early 2000’s how little school boards and administrators knew about technology. A principal with whom I worked actually advised his fellow administrators not to jump into technology until it “settled down and stopped its rapid change.” While we focusing on “college and career readiness” we have seen many, many school districts literally dismantle their technical education programs, many of which were replaced by “at-risk” programs since there were few options in the trades to achieve “career readiness.”

Looking forward, we know we can’t continue “doing what we’ve always done, as it will only get us to where we’ve already been.” The legacy PK-12 system of old produced the world’s greatest scientists, researchers, entrepreneurs, business leaders and world leaders. If we look closely at most current school systems they have changed little in the past 40 years. Oh yes, we have more technology but the students in our classrooms are frequently learning more “outside” the classroom than inside. Why? Because they have choice and voice in what they want to learn on the “outside.” Our legacy system dictates what students will learn or must learn what “we” decide they need to learn to graduate and yet most educators will agree we are NOT properly preparing students for the future. Why? Because we need to develop two or more models of K-12 education. Our current system should continue as is since it is still successful for about 50% of our students. A second model should allow students more experiential or hands-on learning that we refer to as “project-based learning” or PBL. It is actually becoming quite popular in the K-12 sector however, I see most school districts doing what we’ve usually done, trying to squeeze PBL into our existing system and it’s rigid schedules; use of staff at specific times during the day for specific content courses will squelch most attempts at implementing PBL but many districts do so anyway. And who is at fault when they fail? It must be the model or the teachers! PBL learning models must be available for students who learn best through such an approach. This might include science, STEM, welding, community/collaborative learning, internships, engineering etc. We are ill preparing students for the futures they will eventually face and most of us don’t recognize it.

As our state’s educational leaders and administrators move to Milwaukee for three days of professional development, I would like to suggest a few priorities as you browse the exhibit area and the sessions you consider attending:

  1. Sessions on project/inquiry based learning or experiential learning
  2. Teacher shared leadership models in school buildings
  3. STEM sessions using experiential learning
  4. Sessions on career and technical education training, again with a hands-on emphasis
  5. Sessions on building positive school culture
  6. Place-based learning that incorporates the community in student learning

In closing, I’ve been involved in tsunamis of “school reform” efforts over the past 40 years and I think most would agree, few have really taken root and transformed a several grade level building let alone a medium to large school district. One last suggestion to learn more about creating “innovative schools,” visit the Innovative Schools Network booth in the exhibitor area and learn how to transform education, “one school at a time.”

Creating KTEC: Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum

Creating KTEC: Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum

The mission of Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum (KTEC), a preschool – eighth grade charter school that engages all students in an innovative learning environment, is to prepare students through academic excellence by the use of 21st Century skills and technology integration. Students at KTEC are participants and collaborators in engaging lessons that integrate technology into all curriculum areas to ensure learning and higher order thinking skills.

The Kenosha School of Technology Enhanced Curriculum (KTEC) serves the needs of students in preschool through eighth grade.  KTEC opened with 325 students in the fall of 2007 and now is at capacity with 471 students and over 300 on a waiting list.

We all know that technology has revolutionized how people around the world work, play, and communicate.  Studies show that the meaningful integration of technology into the curriculum can enhance student learning.  Integrating technology in the curriculum also helps students improve the skills that are necessary to succeed in a future dominated by technology.

The IES (Institute of Education Sciences) Practice Guide, published by the U.S. Department of Education, presents evidence-based advice to practitioners working to encourage girls in mathematics and science. The Guide provides five recommendations for encouraging girls in mathematics and science, including the level of evidence to support each recommendation and guidance for carrying out each recommendation. These recommendations include the following:

  1. Teachers should explicitly teach students that academic abilities are expandable and improvable in order to enhance girls’ beliefs about their abilities.
  2. Teachers should provide students with prescriptive, informational feedback regarding their performance.
  3. Teachers should expose girls to female role models who have achieved in math or science in order to promote positive beliefs regarding women’s abilities in math and science.
  4. Teachers can foster girls’ long-term interest in math and science by choosing activities connecting math and science activities to careers in ways that do not reinforce existing gender stereotypes and choosing activities that spark initial curiosity about math and science content.
  5. Teachers should provide opportunities for students to engage in spatial skills training.

KTEC is headed in the right direction, utilizing the IES recommendations for the future of their students. According to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, in the next five years, STEM jobs are projected to grow twice as quickly as jobs in other fields. While all jobs are expected to grow by 10%, STEM jobs are expected to increase by 21%. Similarly, 80% of jobs in the next decade will require technical skills. The US Department of Labor claims that out of the 20 fastest growing occupations projected to 2014, fifteen of them require significant mathematics or science preparation. The U.S. will have over one million job openings in STEM-related fields by 2018; yet, according to the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, only 16% of U.S. bachelor’s degrees will specialize in STEM. As a nation, we are not graduating nearly enough STEM majors to supply the demand. To put these numbers into perspective, of the 3.8 million 9th graders in the US, only 233,000 end up choosing a STEM degree in college (National Center for Education Statistics).

One of the major tenets of KTEC is that staff members need to have training that fits the school’s mission as well as their own professional needs and interests. Dr. Angela Andersson, Principal of KTEC, is a leader who believes in shared governance and empowering staff members and parents to take the necessary steps to continue forward progress. As an example, staff members Michelle Zazula and Sarah McMillian have had ongoing national training in STEM practices and Project Lead the Way and are now training not only staff members in their own building but educators across the state and nation.  Scott Hodges has also been trained in myriad STEM approaches as well as Lego Robotics and uses his expertise to offer training across the nation as well.

In partnership with the Wisconsin Innovative Schools Network, KTEC staff have been sharing their practices with educators across the state and continue to do so with planned visitations and collaboration days throughout the 2013-14 school year. You can find out more by visiting InnovativeSchoolsNetwork.com or KTEC.kusd.edu.

Educational Alphabet Soup

ASCD A Lexicon of Learning
What do educators mean when they say….?
Are you wondering what constructivism really means?  How about ungraded schools?  It seems like we are often using acronyms like ESL, NCLB and more jargon that is difficult to understand and even harder to explain to others. Consider going to the ASCD site A Lexicon of Learning  to learn more about educational terminology.  You may also want to consider putting this link on your website and sharing with your schools’ stakeholders to help with communication and understanding.